English Puddings by Mary Norwak (Book Review)

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“The discovery of a new dish does more for the happiness of mankind than the discovery of a star,” wrote the renowned gastronome Brillat-Savarin.

He has a point but speaking from personal experience there is nothing quite like discovering a ‘new’ food writer. Following on from my review of the Best of Jane Grigson, Anne Dolamore of Grub Street had an inkling that I would like English Puddings by Mary Norwak, who until I received this book was entirely unknown to me.

What is the essence of the book?

This book explores the heritage of the quintessential English pudding in its sweet and savoury guise. Covering 16 chapters it charts the provenance of different types of pudding from tipsy cakes and trifles to dumplings and everything in between. Each chapter starts with a potted history of a genre of pudding followed by several recipes displaying a variation within each theme.

About the author

“There can be few country kitchens without at least one fruit-stained Mary Norwak on their shelves,” stated The Telegraph in it’s obituary of this food writer, who died in 2010. However, I’m a little ashamed to say that I am not one of them. I was even more aghast when I discovered that she lived very close to where my parents live in Essex. During her life time she published over 100 cookery books, on topics like preserving, and was the cookery editor for Farmer’s Weekly for 13 years. She also had a keen interest in the social history of eating and cooking which is reflected in English Puddings, by all accounts her most successful publication so it’s good to see it back in print again.

Who will like it?

If you’ve ever wondered what a Bedfordshire Clanger is or how the Half Pay Pudding got its name then you’ll love this book. I don’t think you need a sweet tooth to enjoy this book (it also includes savoury recipes) but it’s a handy thing to have if you want to expand your repertoire of desserts.

Who won’t like it?

Weight conscious folks who like to torture themselves with pictures of calorie filled delights. English Puddings only contains delicious descriptions and there are no obligatory food porn shots found in other cookery books.

What do I like about the book?

I’ve taken real pleasure in reading rather than cooking from this book. Mary’s introductions to the recipes are insightful, interesting and fluid making the recipes themselves seem almost superfluous. The sheer variety of puddings in this book is quite astounding.

What do I dislike about the book?

At the risk of showing my age I found the print a little small.

Would I cook from it?

Definitely!

Where can you buy it?

English Puddings: Sweet & Savoury by Mary Norwak is published by Grub Street (£14.99)

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Coconut & Lime Drizzle Cake

Makes 8 – 10 slices

This is an adaption of Nigella’s coconut cake in How To Be a Domestic Goddess. A great cake to end Afternoon Tea Week on!

Coconut & Lime Drizzle Cake

Ingredients

  • 50g unsweetened desiccated coconut
  • 150ml boiling water
  • 225g coconut oil (I used Vita Coco)
  • 225g caster sugar
  • 200g self raising flour
  • 25g ground almonds
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • Finely grated zest of 3 limes
  • 4 large eggs

Lime syrup

  • 100g icing sugar
  • Juice of 3 limes

Icing

  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 150g icing sugar
  • 1 tbsp unsweetened desiccated coconut

Method

  1. Place the desiccated coconut in a heat proof boil and pour over the water. Leave for around an hour or so until the coconut has absorbed most of the water. Grease and line a 20cm spring form cake tin.
  2. Preheat the oven to 180℃. Place the coconut oil, caster sugar, flour, almonds, baking powder, zest and eggs into the bowl of a food processor. Blitz until combined then add the soaked coconut blitzing briefly to mix. Pour into the prepared tin and bake for around 40 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean when inserted into the cake.
  3. To make the syrup, put the icing sugar and lime juice in a small pan and stir over a gentle heat until the sugar has completely dissolved. As soon as the cake is cooked prick the surface all over with a skewer then drizzle the syrup over the hot cake. Leave the cake to cool in the tin before icing.
  4. To make the icing, sieve the sugar into a bowl then beat in the lime juice to make a thick but spreadable icing (add some water if it is too thick but make sure it isn’t too runny). Spread over the top of the cooled cake then scatter the coconut over the icing. Leave for a while to allow the icing to firm up then serve with a nice cup of tea!

Many thanks to Vita Coco for sending me the coconut oil to use in this recipe. I’ve also used coconut oil in this granola recipe.

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Lemon, Caraway and White Chocolate Butterfly Buns

Makes 12

You’re never too old for butterfly cakes. Perfect for afternoon tea week whatever your age!

Lemon & Caraway Cakes

Ingredients

  • 125g soft butter
  • 125g golden caster sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • Grated zest of 1 lemon
  • 125g self raising flour
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • 25g ground almonds
  • 3 – 4 tbsp buttermilk
  • 1 tsp caraway seeds
  • 75g white chocolate chips
  • ½ x 411g jar lemon curd
  • Icing sugar

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 180℃. Line a 12 hole muffin tin with cupcake cases.
  2. Cream the butter and the sugar together until light and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time beating well after each addition, then add the vanilla extract and lemon zest.
  3. Sieve the flour and baking powder together. Stir in the ground almonds then gradually beat spoonfuls of the flour and almond mixture into egg and butter mixture. Add enough buttermilk to achieve a dropping consistency then fold in the caraway seeds and white chocolate chips.
  4. Divide the mixture evenly between with the cupcake cases. Bake for 15 – 20 minutes until well risen and golden. Remove the cakes from the muffin tin and allow to cool completely on a wire rack.
  5. When cool, insert a knife in the top of each cake and cut a small round. Remove this circle and cut in half to create the butterfly wings. Fill the hole with a generous tsp of lemon curd. Replace the two semi circles at an angle so that they resemble wings. Dust with icing sugar and serve.

Variation 1

To make a large cake, double the ingredients and divide the mixture between two greased and line 20cm loose bottomed sandwich tins. When cool, sandwich the two sponges together with the lemon curd.

Variation 2

Use 100g lemon curd mixed with 100g mascarpone cheese.

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Time for Tea?

I recently wrote a review of Tea: A Miscellany on this blog in which I stated that I am not a tea drinker. Barely a drop of the stuff touches my lips these days. However, I had a Proustian moment a Kew Gardens recently. I was visiting their Full of Spice exhibition. Whilst I was meandering through the gardens I came across an East India Company (EIC) stall selling iced tea. I remembered that I had rather enjoyed drinking iced tea when I lived in America during my teens. The day was warm and sticky so I thought why not give it a go?

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The blend they were serving was Governor Aungier’s Bombay Chai. Now my previous experiences of Chai tea have not been good. It has always been served to me as a luke warm, milky, overly sweet concoction. But this was cool, fragrant and refreshing. A decidedly more pleasant drink all round. So much so that I was compelled to contact the EIC (which was granted a Royal Charter by Queen Elizabeth I in 1600) to find out more about their teas.

Iced oolong tea

EIC’s Oolong range of teas is designed to be served hot or cold. Their exotic blends include Pomegranate & Hibiscus, Yuzu and Orange Blossom. I have to say that I didn’t find the iced Orange Blossom blend quite as enjoyable as the Bombay Chai but it still made for a refreshingly different drink.

Iced tea cocktail

What I found more intriguing was EIC’s suggestion that their Lapsang Souchong tea could be transformed into a cocktail. This tea is wonderfully smoky and evokes memories of bonfires and fireworks. Cooled down and mixed with their lightly floral poppy cordial and some whiskey it makes for an interesting drink and would bring a whole new lease of life to the concept of afternoon tea. I haven’t tried cooking with this tea yet but I suspect it could be used to good effect in sweet and savoury recipes too.

So have I become a tea convert? Well, I’ll never give up my morning coffee but I will concede that perhaps I have been a bit hasty in dismissing all teas. Maybe there is a tea out there for me and it could very well be EIC’s Bombay Chai.

Many thanks to The East India Company for sending me samples of their teas for this post.

For more information on Afternoon Tea Week visit afternoontea.co.uk

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Pork & Chorizo Albondigas with Fennel

Pork & Chorizo Albondigas with Fennel

I recently discovered Beals Farm Charcuterie. Crafted with meat from Phil Beal’s ‘home grown’ Mangalitza pigs in Sussex, he makes delicious charcuterie ranging from Coppa to cooking chorizo (and much more besides). I’ve used the latter in these albondigas (Spanish for meatballs) which are flavoured with fennel seeds and rosemary. As well as being a fan of chorizo I also love fennel which is in season at this time of the year (as featured in the August issue of Sussex Style magazine). I’ve used this anise flavoured bulb to create a rich and aromatic fennel and tomato sauce to go with the albondigas. This makes a delicious tapas dish or can be served with pasta if you prefer.

Makes about 32 (Serves 4 – 6)

Ingredients for the albondigas

  • 100g cooking chorizo, roughly chopped
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic crushed
  • 1 tbsp finely chopped fresh rosemary
  • 400g pork mince
  • Finely grated zest of 1 lemon
  • 2 tsp fennel seeds
  • salt, pepper & nutmeg to season
  • 2 – 3 tbsp olive oil

Ingredients for the fennel & tomato sauce

  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 1 large or 2 small fennel bulbs, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 150ml red wine
  • 140g tin tomato puree
  • 400g tin chopped tomatoes
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • salt & pepper to season

Method

  1. To make the albondigas, place the chorizo, onion, garlic and rosemary in a food processor fitted with a cutting blade. Briefly blitz until everything is finely chopped. Scrape down the sides of the bowl then add the pork mince and lemon zest. Blitz again until everything is combined then add the fennel seeds and season with salt, pepper and a grating of nutmeg. Use the pulse setting to mix the seeds in. Alternatively you can mix all of the ingredients together in a large mixing bowl by hand but you will need to ensure everything is finely chopped beforehand.
  2. Transfer the albondigas mixture to a large board and shape into a large patty (rather like a massive hamburger). Divide this into quarters and then each quarter into 8 pieces. Roll each piece between the palms of your hands (it helps if your hands a slight wet for this) to form small meatballs. Place on a plate until you are ready to cook them (they could be refrigerated at this stage if you wish).
  3. Heat 2 tbsp of the olive oil over a medium heat in a large, fairly deep frying pan. Fry the albondigas until golden brown all over. You will need to do this in batches. Transfer the browned meatballs to a plate lined with absorbent kitchen towel.
  4. You can make the sauce in the same frying pan using more oil if you think you need it. Some chorizo gives off more fat than others so it may not be required. Add the chopped onion and fennel to the pan and fry gently until softened then add the crushed garlic and cook for a minute or so more.
  5. Pour in the red wine and tomato puree. Boil for 1 minute before adding the chopped tomatoes and sugar. Season with a little salt and pepper then bring the sauce back up to boiling point. Add the meatballs and return to a simmer for 30 minutes, stirring the albondigas from time to time to bathe them in the rich sauce. You can eat this as soon as it’s cooked although I think it improves in flavour if you leave it in the fridge overnight and reheat it the next day.
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The Best of Jane Grigson (Book Review)

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Before I begin this review I should declare that Jane Grigson is probably my favourite food writer of all time. So yes, this review will be a tad biased because there was no way on earth that I was not going to like this book.

Why am I such a fan of Jane Grigson? Unlike many of her food writing peers she never talks down to the reader. At no point when you read her recipes (which are eloquently written) do you feel like you are being barked at by a home economist ready to rap you across the knuckles if you make a mistake. Her familiar tone is more reminiscent of today’s writers like Nigella or Jamie. Many of her books were published in the 1970s & 1980s considered by some a culinary wasteland marred by convenience foods and a general beigeness. Yet Jane’s work demonstrated that food could be colourful and above all delicious. She also had a keen interest in food history and tradition which I also share. To quote Roy Fullick, the compiler of this anthology:

“As Jane herself wrote in the introduction to Good Things: ‘Anyone who likes to eat can soon learn to cook well.’ Her books and articles provide and invaluable guide to achieving that culinary success.’

Enough said.

What is the essence of the book?

Roy Fullick has compiled a book of Jane’s recipes as a tribute to her culinary skills and scholarship. It was originally published in 1992 but has been re-released to commemorate the 25th anniversary of her death. The recipes have been sourced from her articles as the cookery writer in the Observer and from her numerous books including her first Charcuterie and French Pork Cookery, which was the result of four years of research.

About the author

Like so many good food writers Jane did not start out life as a home economist or food writer. She read English Literature at Cambridge and became a picture researcher for a London publisher. It was becoming the owner of a small house in France with her husband Geoffrey that sparked her interest in food. She divided her time between France and England although her recipes are influenced by cultures much further afield.

Following her death from cancer in 1990 an educational trust was set up in her memory. For more information about it visit www.janegrigsontrust.org.uk

Who will like it?

Obviously if you are already a fan like me you’ll love it. However, if you have never heard of Jane Grigson and want to find out more then this book is an ideal place to start. Be warned though that you may end up buying lots more of her books as a result!

Who won’t like it?

Part of the joy of Jane’s work is the way she writes so if you don’t like leisurely introductions to recipes then this book probably won’t appeal to you. Equally, if you have every single one of Jane’s books and articles then you probably don’t need this book. But there again there may be one or two in this collection that you don’t have…

What do I like about the book?

I like the way the book has been set out. It would have been easy to devote a chapter to each of her books. However, Fullick has chosen to collect them by the areas that influenced Jane’s writing. So you have chapters like At Home in England and The America’s. Each chapter includes recipes from across the range of her books. What it has made me realise is that she drew her inspiration from a far broader sphere than I had ever considered before. It makes for an eclectic and fascinating collection of recipes.

What do I dislike about the book?

Frankly, the lack of pictures with each recipe doesn’t bother me. However, I know that many people will find this disconcerting and would perhaps regard the book as being dull as a result. All I can say is that this would be a poor excuse not to buy this book. Jane’s recipes are easy to follow and I have never yet tried one that hasn’t worked. Plus if you don’t have a picture who’s to say the recipe didn’t turn out as it should?

Would I cook from it?

Yes!

Where can you buy it?

The Best of Jane Grigson is available from Grub Street priced £20

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Coq au Bacchus

Serves 4

Coq au Bacchus 1

When the late Christen Monge handed me a glass of Kingscote The Bacchus wine I really didn’t expect to like it. I don’t generally like white wine unless I’m drinking it with food but this was rather pleasant. Dry yet floral with plenty of citrus notes. It was a pleasure to drink.

I also thought it would be good to cook with. At £16.45 a bottle I know this seems a tad extravagant. But there are many chefs who would happily state that you should only ever cook with a wine you are prepared to drink. I think this is particularly true if the wine is to be a prominent feature of the dish as it is here.

This recipe is adapted from Coq au Riesling in Real Food by the wonderful Nigel Slater. It’s deliciously decadent and like Nigel I agree it needs nothing more than a green salad and perhaps some bread to go with it (you absolutely cannot waste this wonderful sauce).

Ingredients

  • 25g unsalted butter
  • 2 tbsp rapeseed oil
  • 8 chicken thighs with skin and on the bone
  • 80g smoked pancetta or streaky bacon pieces
  • 8 shallots, peeled and left whole
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped
  • 200g chestnut mushrooms
  • 1 tbsp plain flour
  • 500ml The Bacchus wine
  • 200g mascarpone cheese
  • 3 tbsp tarragon, finely chopped
  • Salt & pepper to season

Coq au Bacchus 2

Method

  1. Put the butter and oil in a large, lidded, shallow casserole or frying pan and heat until the butter has melted. Brown the chicken thighs over a medium heat until golden brown. Remove from the pan and reserve until required.
  2. Add more oil if necessary to the pan then add the pancetta or bacon and cook until beginning to brown then add the shallots. Once the shallots start to take on some colour add the garlic and mushrooms. Continue to cook for a minute or two.
  3. Tip the flour into the pan and cook for a minute before adding the wine, stirring as you do so. Once the sauce is bubbling and beginning to thicken return the chicken to the casserole. Cover and simmer for about 25 – 30 minutes turning the chicken from time to time. Once the chicken is cooked remove from the pan then add the mascarpone, chopped tarragon and seasoning.  If the sauce seems too thick for your liking you can always thin it with a bit more wine (assuming you haven’t already drunk it!). Once these have been thoroughly incorporated return the chicken to the pan and serve as described above.

You can make this recipe in advance. Cook the chicken as described above but do not add the mascarpone or tarragon until the chicken has been thoroughly reheated.

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Unnaturally Natural

I borrowed a pen from a friend several weeks ago. It was one of those promotional biros you frequently get given as a ‘free’ gift. There was nothing particularly remarkable about it. The off white, smooth plasticky feeling cylinder felt at ease in my hand and wrote like any other cheap pen. I forget which organisation it was promoting. What I do recall is seeing the words ‘made from recycled cornstarch’ inscribed on the side of its barrel.

Recycled cornstarch.

I mulled those words over before I returned the pen to it’s owner. In my food centric world cornstarch, or corn flour as we call it in the UK, is an edible ingredient. And this pen was about as an inedible an object you could find. How could something I use regularly to thicken sauces become a pen?

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Around the same time I was sent a review copy of a new book published by Joanna Blythman called Swallow This. It’s taken me some time to get through it. Blythman is a skilled writer and I have read many of her books. Her prose is informative and engaging. The issue lay not with her writing but with her subject matter. In the book she uncovers the truth behind those so called ‘clean labels’ for foods we believe to be wholesome but in reality are anything but. For a food savvy consumer such as myself it makes uncomfortable reading. If you’ve ever had that feeling in your stomach like you’ve swallowed a pound of lead when you realise you’ve been duped then you’ll know what I mean. It’s not pleasant reading.

It turns out that the food processing industry has plenty of dirty tricks up its sleeve to prolong the life of products which they are not obliged to declare on their labels. Take our friend starch. You and I will be familiar with starchy foods like flour, potatoes and rice but starch comes is a myriad of forms. It can be used to replace butter to make products lighter. It can stop ingredients from separating in sauces and soups. It can mimic fat in items like sausages and extend the life of yoghurts. As Blythman sums up:

“Whatever consistency is needed – crisp, crunchy, melting, creamy, succulent, gummy, mouth filling, elastic, smooth, shreddable, jellied, stringy, cuttable, short, cohesive or chewy – multi-tasking starch can deliver it.”

Plus it can be turned into pens.

The most worrying thing about these revelations is how little the manufacturer has to declare on the label. My generation has been brought up to mistrust E numbers. Manufacturers have become wise to this and now use ‘functional starches’ which are perceived as being cleaner, and ergo more ‘natural’, because they are not chemically altered (their structure is changed using things like heat instead). These will simply appear on labels as ‘starch’, ‘dextrin’ or ‘soluble fibre’.

Before you blow a gasket at the duplicitous nature of the food processing industry take some comfort in the fact that even Blythman with 25 years of investigative journalism under her belt didn’t realise the extent of their deception until she began delving into their ways and means. The fact of the matter is that we have all been conned. She even makes an apology in the introduction for dulling our appetite for products we use on a regular basis. It makes you realise that pretty much everything that comes in a jar, packet, can or tube has been tampered with. Nothing is sacred. This book is a testament to the fact that cooking from scratch is the only way to really know what is going into your food (although that also opens up the other can of worms regarding organic vs non organic products).

“These days, cooking is a powerful political statement, a small daily act of resistance that gives us significantly more control of our lives,” concludes Blythman.

Swallow This is uncomfortable yet compulsive reading. Just don’t pick it up right before you eat dinner.

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Swallow This by Joanna Blythman (4th Estate) is currently available on Amazon priced £10.49

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Brewing Britain Review

Brewing Britain

Before I launch headlong into this review, I should state for the record that I am not a beer drinker although I have watched the growth of craft breweries in recent years with interest. The variety of beers available now means that everyone should be able to find a beer to their liking. So whilst I am not a copious consumer of the stuff I do enjoy a glass of beer which has a bit more about it than a freezing cold pint of lager. As a cook I am naturally drawn to the process behind making it. As someone with an interest in history I’m eager to learn the story behind this process. So I hoped that Brewing Britain would fulfil both of these quests.

What is the essence of the book?

Brewing Britain is a comprehensive guide to how beer is brewed and how best to appreciate it. It wisely sidesteps away from being overly technical but remains incredibly informative. From how to taste beers, brewing your own (including gruit ales) and identifying the best beer festivals and brewing shops in the country, Brewing Britain pretty much covers it all.

About the author

As a member of the British Guild of Beer Writers and CAMRA plus a host of drink accolades to his name, Andy Hamilton is definitely the right man to pen this book. As well as writing about it he also makes the stuff from farmed and foraged ingredients. Among his brewing recipes you will even find one for a hangover tea, which contains pine needles and calls to mind loo cleaner but having never tried it who am I to comment?

Who will like it?

Beer lovers (naturally), particularly those intrepid enough to want to make their own. If you are fairly new to the world of beer and want to learn more then this book would be a great place to start.

Who won’t like it?

If you can’t abide the stuff then you are unlikely to give this book space in your Amazon basket. Conversely, if you love drinking beer but really couldn’t give a fig about they whys and wherefores of its production then you’re probably not going to waste your valuable drinking time reading it.

What do I like about the book?

I like Andy’s informative style. He does a great job of conveying the technical information in an entertaining and easy to understand manner. I also love the fact that you can dip in and out of this book at leisure so there’s no reason to get technical beer overload.

What do I dislike about the book?

This is one is very personal to me but I would have loved to have seen a stand alone chapter on the history of beer. Andy does include snippets of historical information here and there (such as the use of herb bennet by the Benedictine monks in flavouring beer) which, for me, are really fascinating. As it stands Brewing Britain is a very good book it just didn’t quite tick all of my boxes.

Would I brew from it?

Yes, one day I would love to. I’ve tried fruit wines and now feel ready to progress onto beer. With Andy as my guide I’m sure it would be a breeze.

Where can you buy it?

Brewing Britain (Bantam Press) is available on Amazon from 18 June 2015 priced £9.99

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The Royal Heritage Cookbook Review

Royal Heritage Cookbook

I have to confess to being a little disappointed when I initially received The Royal Heritage Cookbook. On the smallish side it seemed fairly lightweight for something which took the author, The Honourable Sarah Macpherson two years to research and write. Given that it’s subtitle is ‘Recipes from High Society and The Royal Court’ I expected something, well, altogether grander particularly as the book carries the princely retail price of £15.

But then I took myself to task realising that perhaps I had spent too much time in the company of glossy cookery tomes with their exquisitely seductive photographs. After all, if you are a cook what really counts is the content of the recipe book not how pretty it looks.

What is the essence of the book?

The Royal Heritage Cookbook is a collection of recipes from the 17th century onwards from Lacock Abbey, Castletown House and Thirlestane Castle. Sarah Macpherson discovered more than 1500 recipes during her research, a small proportion of which she has adapted so that they may be successfully cooked in our 21st century kitchens. She even suggests menus so that you can recreate regal meals at home.

About the author

Sarah Macpherson is a historian and writer who happens to be the daughter of Lord and Lady Carew. She was raised in Castletown House, Ireland’s largest private home, and can trace her heritage back to the sixteenth and seventeenth-century Kings of England and Scotland, and the ancient Princes of Ireland. Given her pedigree it’s fair to assume she is well acquainted with stately homes and their kitchens.

Who will like it?

Anyone with an interest in culinary history who perhaps wants to learn a little more about how our grander ancestors ate will like this book. If you are looking for an introduction to historical cookery that is neither daunting in it’s language (the recipes are in modern English) or ingredients then this book is ideal. The recipes are surprisingly and reassuringly familiar like the Chicken, Cream and Leek Pie (a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I).

Who won’t like it?

If you prefer a more modernist approach to cooking and are a fan of foams and skid marks on plates then you are unlikely to be impressed by this book. You’ll probably be disappointed to learn that Charles II’s favourite dish was Roast Sirloin of Beef or that Queen Victoria was partial to trifle. Equally, if you are a serious food historian who enjoys reading old cookery books with all their quirky olde English spellings and terminology then you may find the recipes somewhat dumbed down (but then again this isn’t a academic book).

What do I like about the book?

I love the inclusion of a chapter on curries in the book which demonstrates that these dishes date further back than many people would expect. The images of the original text make you appreciate what a monumental task it must have been to decipher it. It’s wonderfully reassuring in a way to realise that our former kings and queens had what today would be regarded as rather conservative tastes. But of course in their day meat for the masses was scarce and what we now consider as every day fare was viewed as being extravagant in previous centuries.

What do I dislike about the book?

OK I know I said that you should judge a book by it’s content but I really do believe the photography lets this book down. Frankly it looks rather dated. Having a keen interest in food history myself I would have liked to see more information about the sources of the recipes and perhaps more detail on how they were created.

Would I cook from it?

Yes I would. I’m definitely intrigued by the Raj curry powder and some of the desserts like sack posset. For an experienced cook a lot of the recipes for pies and casseroles are run of the mill. That said it would be fun to recreate the Kings or Princes menus for a historical dinner party.

Where can you buy it?

The Royal Heritage Cookbook (History Press) is available from Waterstones priced £15 (although Amazon have it listed as £6.15).

 

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